FUTURE CEOS

TOP 50 UP AND COMING WOMEN IN MUSIC

ANNOUNCED WEEKLY

Our new campaign “Future CEOs” presents an up and coming woman in the industry and their work each and every week. Supporting women in music is vital to stopping the gender divide we are still experiencing. We choose a hard working and courageous individual to help inspire others, find people to network with and show what young creatives are doing now!

ZOE WAGGITT

This week’s Future CEO is Founder of Affinity Blog, Zoe Waggitt! Keeping up with our run of incredibly talented journalists, we are so happy to feature Zoe and have this truly heartwarming interview for this toasty Tuesday. Having such young women bringing their drive, energy and talent and then putting it all into the music industry, it leaves us with no doubt that creatives like Zoe will be making massive movements anytime soon. So take a look at our interview where we discuss pushing passed a lack of self confidence, pursuing journalism and fighting for what we believe in. If you need a bit of motivation, this is where you’re gonna find it!

How did you get into the music industry?

I got into the music industry because, ironically enough, a male acquaintance told me I couldn’t. I used to be a very “sit down and take it” kind of girl, but when I was told that I couldn’t possibly become a writer and make anything of it, I was determined to prove him wrong. I’d like to think I’ve done just that, even at this young age. 


What is the best thing about what you do?

Oh, god, I absolutely love what I do (for the most part – if we don’t think too much about the misogyny and superiority complexes within it), but if I had to choose the BEST thing? Probably watching the little artists you love grow – you know when you review their first single then a year later they’re doing headline gigs in their city’s prized venue? Yeah, that makes me feel pretty good.


Where do you see yourself in the future?

Everyone always tells me “don’t wish your life away! You’re only young!” And they’re right, to an extent; I’ve just turned 18 and I shouldn’t be overthinking the future, but – not to be too cliche – I’d fucking love to change to world. Do something cool. I’d love to turn this whole running a blog thing from a hobby into a full-time thing, and to go into journalism properly; to get out there as an activist and fight for everything I believe in. Christ, that’s probably the most cheesy answer ever isn’t it?!


What is your greatest achievement?

My greatest achievement? Hmm. It isn’t an academic, physical, anything like that kind of achievement, but I overcame the worst and got my life back on track. I’m the LAST person to talk about my struggles – and it’s very nerve-wracking doing it now for people to read about hahah! – but I’m about to move into the next chapter of my life – move across the country, begin university – happier and healthier than I’ve ever been. BUT, if we’re talking achievements in terms of “being in the industry,” then, actually having the balls and the confidence to get a blog up and running; I’d always put it off out of fear of judgment and lack of confidence, but I did it and it’s paid off, right? I mean if I hadn’t I definitely wouldn’t be talking to you guys today!


Favourite music experience?

Probably seeing GIRLI and The Tuts back in 2017; I think Toomey is one of the main reasons I’m such a feminist and advocate for equal rights. Her track “Girls Get Angry Too” takes all the stereotypes of feminists – bra-burning, hairy crazy ladies who hate men – and turns them on their heads, telling us that actually it is okay if we don’t want kids, or to shave, or to wear a bra; that our bodies are ours to do with what we wish. I loved that gig for more than just the music, as I came out of it with a different attitude, and for the last three years I’ve been fighting for equality more than ever.


Your favourite ways to network?

One of my absolute favourite ways to network is at gigs, you meet so many likeminded people there – obviously, you’re all there for the same reason – and it’s so easy to talk about the music. I also love Twitter; I can criticise social media and its toxic aspects until the cows come home, but I think it’s such a hive of information and opportunity! Obviously I can only talk from personal experience, but I’ve connected with some pretty cool people online!


The hardest part of getting to where you are now and how you overcame it?

Every situation has its downfalls, but I think one of the most difficult things about getting to where I am now has been a personal thing, and it’s all down to the lack of confidence. Questioning whether what I’m writing is good enough, are the things I’m doing worthwhile? I’ve only been doing this whole journalism thing for just over a year, but my head has definitely been my worst enemy through it all. Overcoming it has been pretty hard – I still have days of self doubt where I’m tempted to give it all up – but I just remind myself of the support I receive from people around me, and the appreciation of every single musician I work with; things like that make the bad days a little better.


What content have you been loving?

I can’t be interviewed by Sass and Snarl and not mention you guys! I absolutely love what you stand for, and your little motivational quotes really do make me feel a little more empowered; your content is fab and I absolutely love seeing posts from you. Tits Upon Tyne is another account I’ve been loving; their focus on fighting gender inequalities, racism, s*xual assault – and female empowerment as a whole – is so inspiring, and is incredible to see!


What women should we be looking up to right now?

One of my favourite women in the industry at the minute is Lucy McCourt. She’s one of my biggest inspirations and her work and looking at the things she’s achieved – at such a young age – is part of the reason I started this whole thing. Her two recent endeavours – Artists Against Harassment and Girls Excel – are so, so important and the work she’s doing for them is immense. Lucy is definitely a lady we should be looking up to and supporting!


What advice would you give to creatives starting out?

Oh gosh, I never thought I’d be giving anyone advice, but to any and all all potential creatives reading: GO FOR IT! Start that blog, send that email, start that band; do the things you’ve been sat on. If you’re waiting for a specific sign, this is it. This is me, this is the UNIVERSE, telling you to go and follow your dreams; it takes a lot of graft but I PROMISE you, with enough effort and love, you can get to where you want to be! Don’t waste any more time wondering.


How can you stand out in the music industry?

My age is a factor in me “standing out,” I think. I’m so young yet striving for such big things. Not so long ago I was labelled a “whiny little teen with no direction” for being a young’un with a music blog, but I think it’s amazing that I – and so many other people – are starting out young!  We might not know what we’re doing as much as those who are a bit older and more experienced, but it’s all a learning curve, right? I’m young and passionate, and – not to toot my own horn – quite TALENTED, and I think that’s a pretty good place to start in making a difference!


Do you notice a lack of equality and representation? 

Oh, 100%. You’ve been living under a rock if you don’t think there’s an inequality and imbalance within the industry. We all remember Geoff Ellis’ statement that more women need to be picking up guitars and playing in bands, and that highlights the complete lack of representation of females in the industry. Take Reading and Leeds’ 2021 lineup – 6 headliners, all men, despite the fact that there are so many talented women and non-binary people that could headline that festival, and so many other festivals that aren’t representing women correctly. When I was younger I used to think the negative treatment of women was only them being seen as housewives and homemakers, but now I’m that bit older, and more educated, it’s clear to see how prevalent it is, even in the 21st century. It’s something we should all be striving to change, not just in the music industry but in society as a whole. To be a “feminist” is still seen as quite a negative thing to some people, but we should ALL be feminists, we should all believe in equal rights; there’s just no need for gender inequality, you know? Women are pretty fucking cool, too.

GEORGIA BLACKMAN

This weeks Future CEO is editor-in-chief of Happy People Music, an innovative music blog making sure the talent of our industry is getting the recognition it deserves! With an abundance of music reviews and photography, it is clear how passionate Blackman and her team must be! With over a million views on the site, we can’t wait to see the success both Happy People Music and Georgia Blackman will have in the future. In our interview, Blackman gives insights into how to make movements in our industry and what music blogs we need to be keeping up with!

How did you get into the music industry? 

I got into the music industry when I was around fifteen/sixteen years old. My uncle had a friend [Elena] who ran and still does run, Popped Music which is a Liverpool based music blog. I wanted to write about music and my love for it so that’s where I started my journey. I would freelance for publications, blogs and did my best to get my name out there. Then when I moved to University, I started my own music blog as a hobby and to practise my writing skills during my music journalism degree and from there I have worked constantly on my website. 

What is the best thing about what you do?

The best thing about what I do is creating friendships and relationships with bands and other journalists. I’ve made so many friends during the course of my journey so far. Seeing a lot of my journalist friends achieve some great things is what I thoroughly enjoy. Going to gigs and being able write down my feelings after and if I love a band or a song, I get to rave about it constantly – I love seeing success around me and people doing amazing things. 

Where do you see yourself in the future?

This is a difficult question because I don’t think about it as much as I should, I tend to dream a lot about Happy People Music becoming one of the powerhouses of the music industry… So, realistically I may see myself becoming a huge, successful journalist but other than that, taking every day as it comes is how I work best. 

What is your greatest achievement?

Since Happy People Music started almost three years ago there have been so many achievements and amazing things that I have done, in particular, throughout the entirety of lockdown, I managed to work on my website more which meant a huge rise in views and visitors to the website. I would say hitting half a million views in less than a few months… but the views are at almost one million so when me and my team hit that number – that will be my answer! 

Your favourite ways to network?

My favourite ways to network would be mainly through the power of social media, especially through the pandemic. It’s been great to message other women especially within the music industry to see how they work. Another great way for me to network is to be active on my emails, I know there will be a few people who might say I take a while to reply but once something has been covered, it’s sent off to PR to gain shares across the board, this being it helps PR to understand the way me and my team work and it makes them want to carry on working with us. Before the pandemic, I would get to as many gigs as possible and the aim of the game is to talk. It’s all very social media heavy at the moment, which is fine but talking is a great way also, the power of ‘the word of mouth’ is great. 

http://happypeoplemusic.co.uk

The hardest part of getting to where you are now and how you overcame it?

I, personally, think it’s incredibly difficult running a site and being a woman – I don’t seem to be taken as seriously as male editors which is a shame – I had a comment once from a male in the industry who asked me “you do all of that? I didn’t think you were good enough for that!” and I overcame it by carrying on and chipping away. I shouldn’t have to prove myself to anyone but that seemed to of been the case. 

It was hard to break through and for the website to be recognised at first, but hard work pays off and it takes time and perseverance. 

What content have you been loving?

There’s so much content that I love and I would be sitting here all day telling you about them. ‘Words For Music’, ‘One Great Song’ and ‘Sounds Good’ to name a few are three amazing powerhouses in the music industry right now – they support new music which is a must and all three websites have amazing, hardworking teams. It’s always important as a music blog to support new and upcoming bands and artists because music journalists are important to their careers. Anyone and everyone should check these websites out. 

What women should we be looking up to right now?

Rebecca Mason, the editor of One Great Song who I mentioned previously – she has formed a community within her website who are mostly women. It’s great to see them supporting new music and Rebecca is making her mark in the music industry. Lauren Dodd who is a huge part of many publications and is a huge advocate for new music. She is one of the most supportive women I’ve ever had the pleasure of knowing.

There are so many women making moves in the industry – the males just get much more spotlight… because well, they’re men. 

What advice would you give to creatives starting out?

Patience, perseverance and passion are the key ingredients when starting out. You need the drive and motivation to put work into what you love doing – the music industry is a tough place to start in, especially when starting a platform through social media. If anyone was to start a music blog, patience is everything, your time will come when you start gaining contacts. It’s taken me years to get to where I am but it’s all worth it in the end. 

How can you stand out in the music industry?

Be bold and unique and don’t let anything stand in your way, people will see you more if you’re out there with your views; show off and tell everyone about your work. It’s okay to be confident when you know you’re doing well and think outside the box and just be yourself, there’s nothing better than being proud. 

Do you notice a lack of equality and representation? 

I notice it all the time. The music industry is flooded with men and even on festival line ups but, there is one hundred percent a lack of equality when it comes to women, it’s a lot harder getting your name and brand out there. Males who are in a band seem to get more coverage and somehow, we need to make a U-turn on it, but how we do that is the biggest challenge we will face in the industry. Recently, I’ve seen so many women do some amazing things, let’s hope this is the start for us. 

NAOMI SANDERS

We are kicking back off our FUTURE CEO campaign with the insanely talented music journalist Naomi Sanders. As we finally feature a rock fanatic, I don’t think we could have chosen anybody better than Naomi Sanders herself! Here you can read our interview speaking about all things women in journalism! With some excellent advice and insights we are definitely keen for some writing tips…

How did you get into the music industry?

 I’ve been a musician for a majority of my life, having attended a music school for 15 years, and having music loving parents growing up. I’ve been writing for websites since 2017, and just kept writing since then.

What is the best thing about what you do?

Meeting people and just listening to them talk about music. It’s always great to hear people’s passion for music and what they do. That’s what people want to know when interviewing and what people should talk about. 

Where do you see yourself in the future?

Hopefully, still talking and writing about music, working with some amazing people and being able to cover every festival and show for a lot of publications. That’s truly the dream. 

What is your greatest achievement?

Interviewing Zakk Wylde for Kerrang! – Zakk is an icon to me as a musician, and writing for a publication I’ve admired for years! He’s a great person and absolutely amazing to chat to.

Favourite music experience?

Getting to do press for Slam Dunk 2018, as hectic as that was running around the whole of Leeds, it was very rewarding to see so many bands and chat to a lot of artists – it truly felt like this was where I was meant to be and what I should be doing with my life.

Your favourite ways to network?

Just chatting with people, out and about (of course before lockdown!) – sometimes meeting at shows, events, festivals; when you know and can see a person, making contacts with them is a lot easier because you know what both parties are like and have already shown who you are as opposed to an email screen.

The hardest part of getting to where you are now and how you overcame it?

Being able to go and do these interviews and shows, especially in the early stage. You can’t do it on your own; you need people surrounding you, supporting you, helping you gain those connections. Us writers, we need to lift each other up in this industry, never tear each other down. If we keep acting like it’s a competition, and that people “steal” work from others, nothing would get done and nothing would progress. 

What content have you been loving?

MoshTalks on Twitch with Beez is always a highlight of my week. I got to help with researching old Marilyn Manson videos for one stream, and it was so cool to see it play out over Twitch. Beez is a great person in general, and I feel lucky to do that work for him.

What women should we be looking up to right now?

The ones I admire are Kerrang Radio’s Sophie K, for always staying real on and off air, and my best friend Yasmine Summan, she’s a seriously talented journalist who knows how to edge up her articles in the best way possible as well as discussing hard topics. There are many fantastic women within the journalism world, especially the ones I’ve worked with, but I think all of them should be looked up to because they’re all doing fantastic work. Even if it’s not posted online in one form or another, a lot of work is going on behind the scenes.

What advice would you give to creatives starting out?

You see something you wanna write about, just do it. Go out there (when it’s safe!), and talk about what you want to talk about. The best way to start on your creative journey is to just do it. You may get turned down many times, but putting pen to paper, actually doing what you want to do, will show how determined, passionate, and hard-working you are, which is what many people admire.

How can you stand out being a journalist?

Make your own writing style. Whilst a lot of places have a specific style you have to stick to, it’s important to give it your own flair so people can recognise it as your own writing. And just be nice to people, especially others in your field – you never know when someone’s gonna help you get a leg up in the world.

Do you notice a lack of equality and representation? 

Absolutely. I make a sheet of all the women performing at festivals (https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1wgQk71SCyjkPD2KQknLpgmQBRiw6KkWTNQ_DWrsPhiw/edit?usp=sharing) and seeing that compared to the men that perform is heartbreaking. It’s even more heartbreaking when women aren’t given the same opportunities to cover these shows and festivals and there is a level of disrespect to women in the music industry, especially photographers and writers. More opportunities need to be given to women so that the scale can finally be balanced – it’s been heavy on one side for far too long!

SARAH OGLESBY

This weeks FUTURE CEO is the incredibly talented Sarah Oglesby. We are so excited to finally feature a photographer in this campaign and we are truly starting off with the bar set high. Sarah has photographed the likes of The Vaccines, Johnny Marr, Billy Bragg and Idles. With an extensive catalogue of Sarah’s style and creativity, we can’t wait to see what she will do next!

So take a look at our interview where Sarah gives some amazing insights to the world of photography, lots of great advice and some truly iconic behind the scenes stories. You also can buy Sarah’s prints from her site linked below, definitely worth checking out and supporting a young creative.

THE VACCINES – PHOTOGRAPHED BY SARAH OGLESBY

How did you get into the music industry?

I’ve always enjoyed music and I began going to gigs in my home town of Hull when I was around 15. Up until I was around 18 I was really into the Hull music scene and loved going to our local venues, especially The Adelphi and Fruit (RIP). I think I really got ‘into the music industry’ when I moved to university in Leeds. My friend was photographing at gigs for our Uni newspaper, ‘The Gryphon’, and I decided to give it a go. Things started kicking off from there really. Whilst reviewing a gig in February 2017, I met a group of lads in a band called Muffin. I became really good friends with them all and began photographing a lot of their gigs, through this I met a lot of other bands, promoters and photographers and kind of built this network up around me. Since then, I’ve met more and more people and worked with the BBC, acted as head of music of Leeds Student Television, assisted on a shoot for NME, worked at festivals such as Humber Street Sesh and This is tomorrow, and photographed the likes of The vaccines, Johnny Marr, Billy Bragg and Idles. It been a case of working hard, continuing to meet people and just photographing at every opportunity.  

What is the best thing about what you do?

I love meeting people and theres always a load of cool and different people at every shoot or event. Ive made some great friends from photographing at gigs and ive also really built up my network by chatting to the other bands, promoters or photographer. Its also always a treat when your added to the band’s rider because you get a free tea! I was once working at a festival with the BBC and we wanted to get our free meal before Liam Gallagher came into the press tent. When we got back we were gutted to find out that Liam had already been and gone and that we’d miss meeting LG purely because we wanted this free Sunday dinner…

Where do you see yourself in the future?

One of my all time biggest goals is to photograph at Glastonbury so I’m hoping that this is something I’ll get to achieve one day once the music scene is back up and running. Also, if anyones seen my Insta, it’s pretty clear how much I’d love to shoot for Dr Martens. Most people think I work for them already from the amount I post but I’m just very passionate about music and fashion and I think the brand depict everything I love about how music allows a person to express their identity though their style.  

What is your greatest achievement?

Creating a stop motion animation! I always loved stop motion as a child and I always wanted to give it a go. None of my modules at Uni offered a stop motion option, however when I got to my final year, I was given the chance to create a moving image project as my dissertation. I combined my love of music and animation and ended up creating a stop motion music video for local Leeds band, DENSE, who I had worked with a lot previously. It took me around 4 months to create just 3 minutes of animation and this wasn’t counting the time it took me to create the models, sets and edit the film. Nevertheless, I had the best time making it and it is probably one of the projects I am most proud of. 

Favourite music experience?

In May 2019 I was working at a festival called ‘This is Tomorrow ‘in Newcastle and on one of the days The Vaccines were playing the main stage. The Vaccines have been my favourite band since I was about 14 so I spent the whole day freaking out. When it came to being able to go into the photo pit and photograph the first 3 songs, I spent 2 of them crying. I just felt so overwhelmed that I was photographing this band and they were singing these anthems of my life and I just cried.

Was pretty embarrassing since I was so close that Justin literally saw me crying whilst I was shouting the songs back at him, but still, one of the best moments.

THE CROWD – PHOTOGRAPHED BY SARAH OGLESBY

Your favourite ways to network?

For networking with upcoming bands and artists I tend to take to Instagram as I think its a popular platform for the industry, however I think my favourite way to network is just by chatting to people at gigs. Its such a small world and somehow everyone knows someone you know or they know someone looking for a photographer and so on. Plus, when talking to someone directly, they can get a good sense of you and your personality and whether they’d like to work with you again. Its much quicker and more personal than sending an email and believe ive built a big network just by chatting to people.

The hardest part of getting to where you are now and how you overcame it?

I guess theres been a lot of times when ive wanted to give up and Ive felt like things aren’t going the way I thought they would. For example, kicking myself for wanting to have achieved something by a certain time that ive yet to accomplish, or feeling like my work isn’t good enough. But you’ve just got to believe in what you are doing, know your worth, develop your skill and keep working hard. Eventually everything will fall into place.

What women should we be looking up to right now?

I wanna say every woman because we all need to support the hell out of each other- but to narrow it down… Photography wise i’m hugely inspired by  Phoebe Fox, Sharon Lopez, Ejatu Shaw, Marieke Macklon, Portia Hunt, and Megan Mechelle Dalton. Their work is so unique and diverse, i’m just in awe everytime I see their photography.

What advice would you give to photographers starting out?

Shoot anything and everything. Literally. Go out to gigs and shoot the crowds, the support bands, the headliners, the venue. The more you shoot the more experience you’ll get, the more you develop your skills, the more you get to know your camera, and the more people you’ll meet. Don’t be afraid to drop someone a message and ask if you can come down to shoot or to assist a photographer ect, the worst that can happen is that they’ll say no!

How can you stand out being a photographer?

I spent a lot of time questioning this myself when I first started out and I think what I gathered is that you need to have your own unique style. It took me a long time to figure out how I liked to shoot and what kind of editing style I preferred; for me, as soon as I used a flash gun I knew that I wanted to use it for all of my music photography. I loved the harshness and contrasts that I could create and I began to use this shooting and editing style at most gigs. Again, I found this through experience of shooting and trying out different styles and techniques over time.  

Do you notice a lack of equality and representation? 

For myself as a photographer, I have noticed a gender imbalance particularly in photo pits or at events which are generally filled with older male photographers. Many female photographers I have spoken to have also noted this and some have talked about experiences of being talked down to, pushed out of the way or made to feel uncomfortable. Furthermore, if the bands and crew that are playing at a gig are all male on that particular night, I understand how it can be quite intimidating for a photographer to be the only female there and its particularly degrading to have people assume you’re only there because you’re someone’s girlfriend…no hun. Musician wise, I remember reading an article early this year (pre-covid) how in the Leeds and Reading announcement, only 20 out of the 91 artists set to play were female. Furthermore, from the 18 acts who were set to play the main stage, just three of them were women. Although there’s no doubt there’s been some great steps in providing more equality within the industry, there’s still a lot of work that needs doing and a lot more awareness made about it.  

JODIE BRYANT

This week’s FUTURE CEO is radio fanatic, Jodie Bryant. Jodie is a relentless advocate for emerging talent and as a presenter for Hoxton Radio and assistant producer for Kiss FM, we definitely know where will be keeping up with her new discoveries. Jodie is perfect for our FUTURE CEO campaign as she exudes positivity into the music and radio industry and wants to help young creatives cut through the clutter.

So take a look at our interview with Jodie where gives some great advice and some much needed inspiration. Don’t forget to take this opportunity to connect, support and share!


How did you get into the music industry?

I started out by joining my student radio station – Fuse FM in Manchester a few years ago. I loved it and successfully applied to become the Head of Music which meant sorting out interviews and press tickets to gigs for members of the station. I realised how important the connections I had made with record labels and promotion companies were and I made sure to keep them up after university. I also found a love of new music whilst presenting and producing for Digital Station MCR Live. I played artists such as Patawawa, Blossoms, Mae Muller and Oh Wonder before they made it big and have a good reputation now amongst new and upcoming talent. 

What is the best thing about what you do?

The reason I love my job is because I love everything radio. I enjoy music, especially new music, and dedicate a lot of my time discovering new artists. It’s a fun industry to work in and despite starting most days at 5am – every day is a laugh. It’s super creative and you are constantly coming up with new ideas for content and features. 

One of my favourite things about my job is that no two days are the same. I work in multiple capacities meaning I never get bored! I am assistant producer on Kiss Breakfast, I present on Hoxton Radio, I produce a podcast for Absolute radio and I host New Music Mondays at the Ned (when it’s open!)  

Where do you see yourself in the future?

I want to produce a national show on radio, continue to champion new music and help young people break into the radio industry. 

What is your greatest achievement?

Last year I produced and directed an audio documentary called ‘Britpop… you’ve gotta roll with it’ that was played out on Absolute Radio. I pitched the idea to Absolute and it was commissioned for July 2019. This was my first time having complete creative control of a project for national radio so it was really rewarding. It received great feedback from colleagues and listeners, and shaped me into a better producer. 

Favourite music experience?

I’m going to be honest – and if you look at any of my socials you’ll know I love Miley Cyrus (!) I went to the Bangerz tour in London in 2014 and queued from 9am to get into the front row at the O2 Arena. The concert started at 9PM. I knew every single word, took a handmade banner that she read out on stage – proper fan girled. I had the best time and I still think of it as one of the best days of my life! 

Your favourite ways to network?

My favourite way to network is to go for coffee with absolutely everyone I can, get as much advice as possible and take it all on board. You’ve got to be confident! People love to help and share their advice. It helps to build important relationships that can later help you get your foot in the door. You’ve also got to be proactive and keep emailing when people don’t or can’t get back to you. Pester people until they can’t forget you (without being too annoying!) 

The hardest part of getting to where you are now and how you overcame it?

Rejection is definitely the hardest part of getting into radio. It’s an extremely small industry and no matter how much relevant work experience you have for a job – there will be someone with the same or more applying to the same position. Sometimes you won’t get a response – and sometimes you’ll get feedback. You need to take feedback on board – and get more experience until you know that you’re perfect for a job. I think rejection ultimately made me stronger and more confident – turn it into a positive! 

What content have you been loving?

My show on Hoxton Radio focuses on new music and upcoming talent. I have been absolutely loving the creativity of new artists during lockdown. I think the amount of self-produced EPs, zoom music videos and new music that has come out during the last few months is amazing! Just a few examples include Lauran Hibberd’s ‘Old Nudes’, Abbie Ozard’s ‘TV Kween’ and Maisie Peters, ‘Sad Girl Summer’ – as well as Charli XCX’s lockdown album – produced, written and recorded by herself. There’s so many more, but in my opinion female musicians during lockdown have smashed it!

The passion and talent amongst new artists has shown that it is so important that we keep the music industry alive. Once we can (hopefully) go to gigs again – we need to go to them as much as possible!

What women should we be looking up to right now?

I really look up to Abbie McCarthy from BBC Radio Introducing in Kent. She started out as an Assistant Producer and has grown and developed her own brand so strongly. Abbie is such a strong supporter of new music and new artists always want to get played on her show. She also created Unity 2020 – which was a virtual festival during Lockdown hosted on the SSE Arena Wembley Facebook. She’s such a good example of taking situations and turning them into something positive and she really stands out to me. 

I also look up to the new KISS Content Director, Rebecca Frank. She’s the first female head of a commercial radio station and has such a strong vision for the station. She moved to London from New Zealand just before Lockdown – and has handled everything so well. She is definitely a role model for me. 

What have you learnt about the radio industry that others might not know?

Don’t spend too long on anything. It might not ever be perfect and if something goes wrong – never dwell on it. Just move on! 

How can you stand out being in the radio industry?

Being positive inside and out of the studio goes a really long way and will get you far. Be known as the person with positive energy and a positive attitude towards work. Say yes to everything – because if you say no to one thing – someone else will swoop in and take that opportunity!

CHARLOTTE DAVIES AND PETTY MANAGEMENT

Charlotte found their calling once they had taken that first step in the music industry. Opening that door allowed Charlotte to throw them self into any opportunity that came along. With a taste for DJing, Charlotte built up their career and launched Thirsty Girls Collective with a few friends where they DJed across Manchester and supported artists like Anna Calvi and Years and Years. Charlotte was due to play a few festivals this year so hopefully we can see them in the future to have the ultimate party. Other than building their career in DJing, Charlotte launched Petty Management, a management company that offers a lot of different services for artists to develop, promote themselves and grow! Having just celebrated their first year, we can’t wait to see the success Charlotte will have as we see their acts flourish and also watch the important message of mental health in music that Charlotte spreads.

At Sass and Snarl, we love seeing people discovering and supporting new talent in the music industry and we love seeing the emerging acts coming out of Petty Management. If you would like to get involved with Charlotte’s company and initiative, they have a brief listed on Syncr where you can submit your music to their Track Of The Day playlist and if you are a music fan, Petty have an Influencer Team where you can help to share their artists music on your social media in return for exclusive merch and tracks.

We are delighted to have Charlotte as this week’s Future CEO and know we will definitely be seeing the household names and success created from Petty Management. Their work is an inspiration, we should all learn to take care of our mental health, focus on what we want for ourselves and build what we are passionate about!

CONNECT WITH CHARLOTTE DAVIES

FIND OUT MORE ABOUT PETTY MANAGEMENT

CAMILLA WHITFIELD AND THE ATOMIC VOX MAGAZINE

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Growing up in Cumbria, you wouldn’t think there would be too much hope for a young music journalist but at the age of seventeen whilst being inspired by the incredible work of Lucy Mccourt, Camilla Whitfield took things into her own hands and started writing! Building her craft whilst writing for a range of different magazines, Camilla moved to Manchester for University which really cemented her desire to be part of the Music Industry, this passion led to Camilla building her own magazine, Atomic Vox, where she and other creators work to support all women in the music industry. Taking inspiration from family and friends, Camilla started her own mini series for Atomic Vox called “Behind the Lens” where she talked about the talent of the photographers she knows that deserve to be talked about! Another impressive campaign led by Atomic Vox was the “Women who Run in the Music World” where she showcases women in the music industry and gives you a behind the scenes insight. So if you are loving Future CEO’s definitely go check that out!

We chose Camilla Whitfield to be one of our Future CEOs because of her relentless work to give inspirational women in this industry the credit they deserve. Empowering and supporting women is so important to us and the charisma that Camilla Whitfield and her team put into Atomic Vox is something Sass and Snarl definitely looks up to. We know we will see Camilla writing for NME or Rolling Stone anytime soon.

READ AND SHARE ATOMIC VOX

CONNECT WITH CAMILLA WHITFIELD

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REBECCA MAY AND THE MUSIC IN MAY PODCAST

Obsessed with new music that pulsates into the industry, Rebecca May is practically your own human jukebox of up and coming bands and indie hits. Going out to gig nights in Cambridge as a young teen, May developed her love for emerging talent and decided to get involved with the radio at her college. Throughout college and studying a broadcast journalism degree at Nottingham Trent, Rebecca started homing in on her presenting skills and came to life delivering new music to her listeners.

The aspiring radio presenter, started her fairly new project, the “Music in May” Podcast in which she continues to interview talent and showcase new music. I’m sure this project won’t be slowing down any time soon. Her list of interviewees start with anyone from Jungle, Tom Grennan and Easy Life to Sports Team, Hippo Campus and Sunflower Bean.

Rebecca May is part of our Future CEOs campaign because she is someone you are going to be hearing on the radio anytime soon! Her determination and drive delivers high quality content and the best new music!

GO FOLLOW MAY ON SOCIALS

LISTEN TO THE MUSIC IN MAY PODCAST HERE

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